Various types of children’s beds

You’re expecting a new bundle of joy in your life and your eldest child needs to change rooms? You’ve moved, or your youngest has turned into a bassinet-climbing acrobat? For this and many other reasons, maybe you have to make do with a room small enough to give you headaches. I don’t have the solution to headaches, but I can sure help you navigate through the various types of children’s beds available on the market. Then you can assess your needs and decide which bed would suit you best.

Platform bed with legs

Platform bed with legs - 3050

Platform bed with legs - 3050

This type of bed has a simple look to it but may be just the ticket if you don’t want to buy a headboard. You can hide storage bins underneath. It’s a cost-effective solution since it doesn’t require a box spring.

 

 

Platform bed with storage

Platform bed with storage - 3159

Platform bed with storage - 3159

This bed doesn’t require a box spring either and has a drawer at the end, which is great for storing blankets and pillows.

 

 

 

 

Mate’s bed

Mate’s bed - Popular collection 2779

Mate’s bed - Popular collection 2779

The mate’s bed has a lot of storage space thanks to its three drawers, without taking up extra space. No box spring is necessary. You will often see it paired with a bookcase headboard, as shown in the photo below. They make for a practical combination in a small room.

 

 

 

Head and footboard bed

Head and footboard bed - Fairy Suite collection 510

Head and footboard bed - Fairy Suite collection 510

For a more classic and potentially more girly look, depending on the colour you choose for the finish and the overall look, pick a complete bed with a headboard and footboard. You will need a box spring. This bed sometimes comes with another bed underneath (trundle bed) that you can also use for storage.

 

 

 

Sleigh bed

Sleigh bed - Vintage collection 477

Sleigh bed - Vintage collection 477

This is very similar to the head and footboard bed, and has a princess feel to it. The benefits are the same, but as the name implies, it has a different structure, as the headboard is curved like an old sleigh. The footboard is sometimes designed in the same way.

 

 

 

Day bed

Day bed - Mini Suite collection 456

Day bed - Mini Suite collection 456

In a way, it is a head and footboard bed but can be turned into a couch when placed lengthwise against a wall. It does not require the use of a box spring. Another bed can be placed under the bed and you can use it for storage. It’s often associated with little girls, but as you can see here, you can pick a finish and design more tailored to boys.

 

 

Loft bed

Loft bed - Logik collection 3342

Loft bed - Logik collection 3342

This bed offers a lot of storage space. As it’s perched up high, you can put a second bed and/or a desk underneath. You can also put it in a corner of the room. In this case, the modules are reversible. A box spring is not necessary for this bed.

 

 

 

Loft bed at half-height

Loft bed at half-height - Imagine collection 3576

Loft bed at half-height - Imagine collection 3576

This bed provides a lot of storage sace. It is a little lower down than regular loft beds, so an adult can make the bed more easily. The modules are reversible and one even allows access to the inside, so the bed can be placed in a corner. No box spring is necessary with this bed, and unlike most other loft beds, it doesn’t come with a second bed. It does, on the other hand, leave room for a variety of creative and fun set-ups.

 

 

You could even use some of these beds in guest rooms, as some aren’t specifically for children and could, with the right decorating touches, be put to good use elsewhere in the home. Have fun shopping!

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